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Wildlife

A Swamp Wallaby in the Garden

Winter in 2015 was quite dry, and the Swamp Wallaby was often seen near the house – which is when I took this photograph.  It’s actually eating the native plants in the garden, after drinking from the water feature.

Thankfully, this Winter has been much wetter, with lots of food for wallabies in the bush. We haven’t seen any wallabies up close this Winter.  While I miss seeing them happily munching away just outside the window, I must admit I am thankful they don’t need to eat the garden this year.  I guess they will return in Summer when there is less to eat in the bush.

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A Swamp Wallaby happily munching away on our native plant garden in 2015.
Daily Challenge, Reflections

The Shifting Shadow

A shadow is misshapen reality. Elongated or shortened by the angle of the sun, familiar objects appear distorted, muted, hidden. As the sun shifts, so does the shadow, and we see the world anew. Perhaps the colours are brighter than we remember or, lit from a different angle, we see the cracks that had escaped our attention.  Sometimes, the shifting light can reveal a beauty we never imagined.

My shadow was breast cancer.After the initial plunge into darkness, I found the sun moved swiftly.  People reached out, treatment wasn’t as bad as I had imagined, and I had time to reflect.  I felt uplifted and embraced. This was Spring 2013 and I took up the camera to photograph the nature around me.  We live on a property with some natural bushland, so I began by photographing wild flowers, trees and birds. The more I looked, the more signs of life I found. Life full of colour, intricate detail and beauty in tiny forms.

Two years later, healthy and trying to get back into work, I realise the shadow of cancer allowed me time to venture on a creative journey I would otherwise not have begun. As the sun moves through the sky I see the myriad artworks in nature awaiting capture through my lens.

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Barely 5cm high, with petals just 2mm across, this tiny Parsons Bands Orchid emerges from the shadowy forest floor. Beauty encapsulated in a tiny form.

 

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Digital Journal

Experimenting with Product Photographs: Outside

After my first attempt to photograph a product featuring one of my photographs in an interior setting, I thought I might have more of a narrative in an exterior setting.   This is an assessed series of photographs for a course in Photography and Social Media which I am completing.

To achieve ten interesting photographs which are themed and together create a narrative, I thought  ‘taking my products for a walk’ might be a good theme.  This meant I could use a few different items and place them in a range of settings to represent a day meandering around in the bushland.  As most of my photographs were originally taken in this same bushland, it would represent both the origin and the culmination of each product.

Conceptually, I liked the idea a great deal. However, to submit photographs taken while I am completing the course, means photographing the items in dry, Summer bushland, rather than lush Spring bushland when the original photographs were taken. Even submitting a collage or mood board with the original Spring photography is not permitted in the assessment criteria.

In Spring a variety of flowers are in bloom, the mosses and lichens are a rich green, wet bark can range from a pale grey, through yellow, pink, salmon, ochre, rust and into deep burgundy and browns.  Often colourful fungi and bright new growth on bracken, heath and trees adds bright green to the mix.  Dotted among this are white, pink, yellow, mauve, purple and blue wild flowers.  So, not being able to include the original photographs means the palette of background colours for a Summer shoot is limited to the yellow of dried native grass, brown and grey bracken, as it dies off, and dry, brown, bark.

Given this limitation, I felt the background was too uniformly drab to create an interesting narrative over ten photographs.  I think I will come back to this idea in Spring 2016 and try it again.  For now, here are some of the photographs with a Summer bushland background.